Powered by Blogger.

LIBERTY AND WAR BONDS & WAR ADVERTISEMENTS.


A COLLECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND ADVERTISEMENTS.
DURING WORLD WAR I & II ACTORS AND ACTRESSES STARRED AND POSED IN MANY TYPES OF ADVERTISEMENTS AND PROPAGANDA. RADIO SHOWS ENDED WITH SEGMENTS ASKING THE AMERICAN PEOPLE TO CONTINUE THEIR PURCHASHING OF WAR BONDS. POSTERS WERE MADE, STARS GRANTED THE PUBLIC SPECIAL APPEARANCES, AND SHORT FILMS WERE PRODUCED AT AN ASTONISHING RATE.

FOR VETERANS DAY, I PRESENT SOME OF THEM NOW.

I.
These advertisements found in various magazines, cookbooks, home journals, and newspapers helped with recruiting soldiers, doctors, nurses, and many other positions. As well as keeping the American people back home busy with their support.

LIBERTY BONDS

Liberty Bonds were the first of it's kind. It was a war bond that was sold in the United States, which supported the Allied cause during World War I. These bonds and subscribing to them became an important act for Americans and was seen as a patriotic duty. The idea of the bond was financial security for many citizens. And because the idea at the time was new to many, famous faces and advertisements were utilized/made. Such as American's sweetheart Mary Pickford and her husband, the equally untouchable, Douglas Fairbanks.


DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, SPEAKS TO A LARGE CROWD IN FRONT OF THE
SUB-TREASURY BUILDING, IN NEW YORK CITY, APRIL 1918. TO AID THE THIRD LIBERTY LOAN.


The first response to the Liberty Bond was less than unenthusiastic. A problem occurred. The higher class were more likely to purchase a bond, compared to the common man and smaller investors. A campaign was then started to popularize the bonds. Well-known artists made posters and picture stars hosted rallies. Including that of a Mr. Charlie Chaplin. The stars used their power amongst people, telling them that it was "the patriotic thing to do" during this time. Chaplin also made a short film, titled THE BOND, all at his own expense. Another campaign was the use of the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, who sold bonds, using the slogan "Every Scout to Save a Soldier."

WAR BONDS


By the summer of nineteen-forty, after Nazi Germany's victories against Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, and Luxembourg, an urgency was brought to the government. An involvement with World War II was being planned. A concern about financing was brought up. A voluntary loan system was created, a mix between baby bonds and Liberty Bonds from the First World War.

These bonds were marketed as "defense bonds" and three new series of bond notes were made, Series E, F, and G. Series E would be labeled as a "defense bond." They were sold for as little as $18.75 and would mature in ten years' time, at which then, the United States government would pay the bondholder $25. You could also purchase one for $50 and $1000, these were non-negotiable bonds, unlike that of the Liberty Bonds. You could also purchase 10-cent saving stamps. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the bond was changed to War Bonds, which would also be the same time that the United States would enter the war. More than 85 million Americans — half the population — purchased bonds totaling $185.7 billion.

During this period, the bonds were promoted using cartoons, such as Warner Brothers's ANY BONDS TODAY? The advertising of these bonds tapped into the culture of the United States. This also included the work of Norman Rockwell and his painting series, the Four Freedoms, which would go on to raise $132 million.


Other forms of advertising were through other companies. Such as car manufacturers and companies like Lucky Strike (cigarettes) which changed their packaging from green to white, they claimed this change was saving bronze for weapons, and because o this, sales went through the roof. Drink companies, such as Coca-Cola depicted their drinks being drunk by members of the armed forces. Companies also ran advertisements for the urgency of buying war bonds.


FILMS

Hollywood, of course, played a major role during World War II. The gangster character during this time was normally replaced with a Nazi. The main overall goal was still to entertain. Musicals, comedies, westerns, and melodramas played an important role in doing so. One important film during this time was CASABLANCA, it became an important film as it represented the role of the studio played during the war, it's feelings toward Vichy and Free French Forces.

HOLLYWOOD STARS

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the entire nation joined the war effort, in one way or another. Actors were no different compared to the common man. Some of the biggest names in pictures joined the call, inspiring thousands to also take the plunge and join the fight.


JIMMY "JAMES" STEWERT.

Stewert tried to join the Army but was turned down because he was underweight. He then spent the next period of time eating tons of steak and pasta, which would return in his favor, as he successfully enlisted with the Air Corps in March of 1941. In January of 1942, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant and served as a four-engine instructor before being sent overseas. 


HENRY FONDA

He had once said that he didn't like being in a fake war film and decided to join the military. He was 37 when he joined the Navy in 1942 and began his service as a quartermaster 3rd Class. He worked in operations and air-combat intelligence in the Central Pacific and was awarded a Bronze Star. At his time of discharge, he was at the rank of lieutenant, in 1945.

II.

THE WOMEN IN WAR


More than 350,000 American women joined the military during World War II, as nurses, and some even drove trucks, performed clerical work, and repaired airplanes. While some had been sadly killed and or captured as prisoners of war.

Advertisements were also created towards women, at home, and in service.




ON THIS VETERANS DAY
I WOULD LIKE TO PERSONALLY
ASK THAT YOU TALK TO A VETERAN,
WATCH A DOCUMENTARY,
READ A MEMOIR OF A SOLDIER,
OR TAKE SOME TIME
AND REFLECT ON THE 
SACRIFICES THAT
THESE MEN, WOMEN,
AND MILLIONS OF ANIMALS
TOOK FOR OUR FREEDOM.

R.